Booke mark this website!
home my account view cart help news otc Welcome! - Login Register
Toll Free Tel: 1-877-270-3784
Toll Free Fax: 1-877-777-9144 . 1-877-703-3005
Drug Search
McAfee Secure sites help keep you safe from identity theft, credit card fraud, spyware, spam, viruses and online scams Privacy Policy by TRUSTe

Click to Call
Download
Order Forms

Get Adobe Acrobat


Buy Abilify Buy Advair
Buy Cialis Buy Flovent
Buy Geodon Buy Januvia
Buy Levaquin Buy Lipitor
Buy Lovenox Buy Nasonex
Buy Nexium Buy Plavix
Buy Singulair Buy Seroquel
Buy Viagra Buy Vytorin
Buy Zetia 

Choosing an Online Canadian Pharmacy

Canadian Online Pharmacies

How To Find A Canadian Internet Pharmacy

Cheap Canadian Drugs

Top 10 Most Popular
Over the Counter meds


Canada drugs



Share/Bookmark

New study finds occupation may be linked to breast cancer



A person's occupations may be linked to his or her risk of developing breast cancer, a new study published in the journal Environmental Health, recently revealed.

A person's occupations may be linked to his or her risk of developing breast cancer, a new study published in the journal Environmental Health, recently revealed.

The study looked at 1006 cases of breast cancer in Southern Ontario, Canada, and investigators used surveys and interviews to gather information on subjects' jobs and reproductive history. Each of the subjects' occupations was rated based on the likelihood of being exposed to carcinogens and endocrine disruptors, which are factors that interfere with the hormonal system.

The researchers found that fields like agriculture, bar and gambling, automotive plastics manufacturing, food canning and metalworking had the highest levels of exposure to carcinogens and endocrine disruptors, and subsequently, the subjects who worked in those fields had a greater risk of developing breast cancer.

The study also revealed a link between high rates of breast cancer and lower socioeconomic status, which the researchers believe is due to industries such as agriculture and manufacturing, which are linked with higher cancer rates, paying lower wages. The research demonstrated the importance of looking at the health hazards of certain fields of work and how it translates to cancer rates.

"Our results highlight the importance of occupational studies in identifying and quantifying environmental risk factors and illustrates the value of taking detailed occupational histories of cancer patients," said study author James T. Brophy, Ph.D. "Mounting evidence suggests that we need to re-evaluate occupational exposure limits in regulatory protection."

Breast cancer facts
According to BreastCancer.org, nearly one in eight women will develop invasive breast cancer within the course of their lives, and in 2011, nearly 39,520 women were expected to die from the condition, although the number of fatalities due to the disease have been decreasing every year since 1990.

Symptoms
The National Cancer Institute (NCI) reports that some symptoms of breast cancer include a lump or a portion of the breast become thicker, a change in the size or shape of the breast as well as secretion of fluid from the breast that is not milk.

Treatments
There are a variety of different treatments for breast cancer that patients can receive, such as a lumpectomy, in which the tumor is removed, or, a partial or total mastectomy, in which part of, or all, of the breast is removed, according to the NCI.

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) note that patients may buy Tamoxifen in order to treat the cancer if it has spread to other parts of the body and it can also be used to decrease the risk of developing cancer, which may be warranted for patients with certain risk factors, such as age or a family history of the disease. Tamoxifen is available from CandianDrugs.

 

 

See also ...

Canada Drug Center | How To Order | Customer Care | About Pharmacy | Contact Pharmacy | News
Policies | Sitemap | Over The Counter Meds | Blog

CanadaDrugCenter Pharmacy Accreditation

Privacy Policy by TRUSTe

Copyright © 2007-2014 by CanadaDrugCenter.com - All rights reserved.